Sadowsky Guitars Web Forum
July 29, 2014, 08:44:35 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: SMF - Just Installed!
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Technique  (Read 3185 times)
P. Bass
Full Member
***
Age: N/A
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Posts: 175



View Profile
« on: June 03, 2010, 03:25:40 PM »

Please take this anywhere it'll make life easier for all the bros.

I'll start w/ something that has had a HUGE effect on my playing comfort.

WARMUP for FINGER AGILITY.
* Hold all 4 fingers together on each hand.
* Curve fingers & slowly rotate the TIP of each thumb around the TIPS of all 4 fingers as they are held together, moving from index finger to pinky on each hand.
* Do 10 revs & then reverse direction for 10 revs. Keep this up for a few minutes.
What this does is "loosens" the tendons across the back of the hand & frees up finger motion.
Give it a chance & try it prior to play & @ the start of a gig set.  
Keeping your hands "in the pocket" feels  pretty "groovy" as well   Wink
« Last Edit: June 04, 2010, 08:57:01 PM by P. Bass » Logged

*Fingers On Flats*
IntenseJim
Moderator
Full Member
*****
Age: N/A
Location: Tahoe Reno with oodles of ski terrain
Posts: 135


I <3 pow, boobs, and Sadowsky


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2010, 07:40:21 PM »

I use that technique for the Brazzers website.
Logged

"I think the only repeat customer we have ever had is some Dr schmuck out in Reno." --Roger
P. Bass
Full Member
***
Age: N/A
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Posts: 175



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2010, 07:52:03 PM »

I use that technique for the Brazzers website.

I thought you played a STRING instrument Shocked
« Last Edit: June 04, 2010, 01:53:33 AM by P. Bass » Logged

*Fingers On Flats*
P. Bass
Full Member
***
Age: N/A
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Posts: 175



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2010, 09:05:09 PM »


I'm having trouble getting accurate intonation set on the E string of a new set of flats. Could it be due to a "dud" E string or am I missing something. I only have a Korg GA-30 tuner to work with but that should be OK-right? Any suggestions? Thanks .
Logged

*Fingers On Flats*
Fran Diaz
Full Member
***
Age: 41
Location: Santander, Spain
Posts: 163


Sadowskyfied!!!


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2010, 04:32:32 AM »


I'm having trouble getting accurate intonation set on the E string of a new set of flats. Could it be due to a "dud" E string or am I missing something. I only have a Korg GA-30 tuner to work with but that should be OK-right? Any suggestions? Thanks .

I'm afraid you need a better tuner, I use that Korg for everyday tuning but I've found it not to be exactly a 'precision' tuner when compared to higher quality tuners, especially for setting the intonation.

In fact, it has such a big tolerance to show the open string in tune that when I use it, I always make sure that it reads in tune for each open string, each note on the fifth fret and the E and B on the ninth fret.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2010, 04:36:07 AM by Fran Diaz » Logged

later
Fran
NYC UltraVintage PJ4
Sweet Daddy Ray
Me on MySpace
joinercape
Newbie
*
Age: 62
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Posts: 11



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2010, 06:01:16 AM »

As silly as it may sound, I still tune up with a tuning fork at home, then tune the bass to itself with harmonics. I play mostly with piano players and horn players, and often have to adjust to the piano anyway. I've always done it that way with the upright too. I have an old Korg DT-1 which I sometimes use on gigs, as it's often too noisey to hear the tuning fork. But I've found I still have to make adjutments, often while playing the next tune, to get the bass in tune with itself and the piano. Since switching to Sadowsky strings (flats) I have had zero issues with bad strings. But I used TI flats for years, and in the last two years, I got a number of bad strings right out of the package. Some that would not intonate, some just very bright or very dead in comparrison to the others. Not very high tech, I know! Probably wouldn't work if I did any recording work, which I don't.
As to the finger stretching, I have suffered with arthritis for a few years now, and if I don't strtch out the hands first before playing I cramp up or end up with extremely cramped and sore hands the next morning. My exercise, suggested by a prominent hand therepyst (sp? it's early!) is slow hyper-extension of the fingers, hold it in both extermes (clenched fist to full finger extension) for a few seconds, and repeat a half dozen times. Then the same with each individual finger. That and squeezing a rubber ball is it, but it really makes a difference.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2010, 06:08:57 AM by joinercape » Logged
Sadowsky
Administrator
Full Member
*****
Location: New York City
Posts: 186


Sadowsky Guitars


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2010, 03:05:56 PM »

Truth be told, flat wound strings are the most prone to defective strings.  The two most common defects are bad intonation or excessive buzzing.    Regarding intonation, the question is "are you unable to get the string to intonate within the range of your bridge adjustment?".  If the answer to that is "yes", the string is defective.  If it just requires a significant readjustment from your previous string, that is probably OK and normal.

A defective string due to buzzing will buzz everywhere, usually not on just a specific fret.

Roger
Logged

Please do not send me messages through the forum.  Please email me directly.  Thanks.
joinercape
Newbie
*
Age: 62
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Posts: 11



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2010, 06:12:18 PM »

Truth be told, flat wound strings are the most prone to defective strings.  The two most common defects are bad intonation or excessive buzzing.    Regarding intonation, the question is "are you unable to get the string to intonate within the range of your bridge adjustment?".  If the answer to that is "yes", the string is defective.  If it just requires a significant readjustment from your previous string, that is probably OK and normal.

A defective string due to buzzing will buzz everywhere, usually not on just a specific fret.

Roger

Thanks Roger....may I ask, when you designed your flat wounds, which I believe I was told are custom wound for you by LaBella, what specific properties did you ask for? I think they are terrific, very musical as flats go.
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!